Distance Learning and AAC: Interviews With Those Who’ve Tried It Distance learning techniques, such as video conferencing and the World Wide Web, offer augmentative communication instructors opportunities to reach new audiences. Division 12 affiliates Mary Ann Romski and Patricia Dowden recently used distance learning to conduct classes in augmentative communication. Following our 1998 ASHA mini-seminar on the topic, they ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2000
Distance Learning and AAC: Interviews With Those Who’ve Tried It
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yvonne Gillette
    School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, The University of Akron
  • Mary Ann Romski
    Department of Communication, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • Patricia Dowden
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2000
Distance Learning and AAC: Interviews With Those Who’ve Tried It
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, March 2000, Vol. 9, 3-5. doi:10.1044/aac9.1.3
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, March 2000, Vol. 9, 3-5. doi:10.1044/aac9.1.3
Distance learning techniques, such as video conferencing and the World Wide Web, offer augmentative communication instructors opportunities to reach new audiences. Division 12 affiliates Mary Ann Romski and Patricia Dowden recently used distance learning to conduct classes in augmentative communication. Following our 1998 ASHA mini-seminar on the topic, they agreed to share their information and experience with the Division 12 Newsletter readers through a series of email interviews.
Yvonne: Pat, you used an asynchronous Web course format. How did you function as an instructor in this environment?
Pat: I've run my course in two different ways. For 3 years it was done through email using an email list. Each day a lecture (that had been written months ahead of time) was delivered to the students. Once a week, they received a discussion question and response to it was mandatory. They also received assignments via email, although they were turned in by fax or “snail” mail. We have recently changed the format to a threaded discussion on a Web site. Instead of “receiving” materials by email, they log onto a Web site and read the lectures and discussions there.
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