Viewing Variations in Language Development: The Communication Play Protocol Most summaries of early language development highlight verbal milestones that include accomplishments such as the proverbial “first word,” an expressive vocabulary “spurt,” and the emergence of two-word “sentences.” However, upon closer inspection, these milestones often do not stand out from the steady flow of on-going social interactions. Therefore, to ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1999
Viewing Variations in Language Development: The Communication Play Protocol
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren B. Adamson
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • Roger Bakeman
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 1999
Viewing Variations in Language Development: The Communication Play Protocol
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, May 1999, Vol. 8, 2-4. doi:10.1044/aac8.2.2
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, May 1999, Vol. 8, 2-4. doi:10.1044/aac8.2.2
Most summaries of early language development highlight verbal milestones that include accomplishments such as the proverbial “first word,” an expressive vocabulary “spurt,” and the emergence of two-word “sentences.” However, upon closer inspection, these milestones often do not stand out from the steady flow of on-going social interactions. Therefore, to gain a full picture of the course toward language, it is necessary to sketch the broad path of early communication development in which verbal milestones are embedded (Adamson, 1996).
In this note, we describe an observational procedure, The Communication Play Protocol, that captures a rich view of a child interacting with his or her caregiver (Adamson & Bakeman, 1999). The protocol is a semi-structured context that is designed to sample a range of communicative functions, including requesting, social interacting, commenting, and narrating. It is intended for use with typically developing toddlers from approximately 18 to 30 months of age and with atypically developing young children between 18 and 48 months of age.
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