Prelinguistic Communication Intervention May be One Way to Help Children With Developmental Delays Learn to Talk One possible explanation for why a 2-year-old may not speak is developmental delay (i.e., general cognitive delay). However, by far the majority of children with developmental delays eventually use speech as their primary communication modality. The fact that some children with developmental delay use speech as their primary communication ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1999
Prelinguistic Communication Intervention May be One Way to Help Children With Developmental Delays Learn to Talk
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul Yoder
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Steven F. Warren
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 1999
Prelinguistic Communication Intervention May be One Way to Help Children With Developmental Delays Learn to Talk
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, May 1999, Vol. 8, 11-12. doi:10.1044/aac8.2.11
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, May 1999, Vol. 8, 11-12. doi:10.1044/aac8.2.11
One possible explanation for why a 2-year-old may not speak is developmental delay (i.e., general cognitive delay). However, by far the majority of children with developmental delays eventually use speech as their primary communication modality.
The fact that some children with developmental delay use speech as their primary communication modality in their 2nd year gives us incentive to discover ways to facilitate non-speaking children’s transition to spoken language as quickly as possible. There are at least three primary ways to address this problem at the present: (a) directly teach the child how to talk, (b) teach the child to use nonspeech communication methods, and (c) teach the child to use gestures and vocalizations to communicate the early pragmatic functions. A naïve person would naturally assume the best option to be “a.” However, it is not at all clear which children will benefit most from each of these methods. Because the latter method has received the least attention, we will describe the rationale, methods, and preliminary data supporting the prelinguistic communication intervention approach.
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