Facilitating an AAC-Friendly Sheltered Workshop Support for augmented communicators at the sheltered workshop (The Work Center) at United Cerebral Palsy (UCP)-Nassau was limited. The staff felt that systems and devices were slow and intrusive within the work area and opportunities for augmented communicators to speak for themselves were limited. Program participants, however, often needed ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 1997
Facilitating an AAC-Friendly Sheltered Workshop
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlotte Plotnick
    United Cerebral Palsy-Nassau County, Inc. Roosevelt, NY
  • Grace Forestieri
    United Cerebral Palsy-Nassau County, Inc. Roosevelt, NY
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   March 01, 1997
Facilitating an AAC-Friendly Sheltered Workshop
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, March 1997, Vol. 6, 4-5. doi:10.1044/aac6.1.4
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, March 1997, Vol. 6, 4-5. doi:10.1044/aac6.1.4
Support for augmented communicators at the sheltered workshop (The Work Center) at United Cerebral Palsy (UCP)-Nassau was limited. The staff felt that systems and devices were slow and intrusive within the work area and opportunities for augmented communicators to speak for themselves were limited. Program participants, however, often needed to clarify job-related issues and also wanted to share personal matters. Frequently, they had difficulty in expressing these ideas clearly, resulting in frustration for both the workshop participants and support staff.
Despite training to help facilitate interactions between program participants and workshop staff, support for the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) continued to be weak. To help resolve these difficulties, a collaborative program involving speech-language pathologists and workshop and rehabilitation technology staff was initiated. The population at The Work Center consists of individuals with multiple disabilities who are physically and/or mentally challenged. Some individuals are nonverbal and many are difficult to understand. Their ability to use sign is reduced because of physical limitations.
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