Evidence-Based Practice: Meeting the Challenge Evidence-based practice (EBP) seems to be the latest buzz word in health-care related fields even though its beginnings date back some 20 years in the field of medicine. Gradually, various health care fields such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, and nursing have engaged in a serious dialogue regarding what EBP ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2003
Evidence-Based Practice: Meeting the Challenge
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  • Ralf W. SchlosserGuest Editor
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Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   September 01, 2003
Evidence-Based Practice: Meeting the Challenge
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2003, Vol. 12, 3-4. doi:10.1044/aac12.4.3
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2003, Vol. 12, 3-4. doi:10.1044/aac12.4.3
Evidence-based practice (EBP) seems to be the latest buzz word in health-care related fields even though its beginnings date back some 20 years in the field of medicine. Gradually, various health care fields such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, and nursing have engaged in a serious dialogue regarding what EBP means to them and how it should be adapted to suit their respective practice fields. In communication disorders, it has been primarily medical speech-language pathology that has begun to discuss EBP (e.g., Worrall, & Bennett, 2001); in non-medical sub-fields of speech-language pathology, however, one often encounters the belief that EBP is a term for something that is obvious and that already occurs. One can counter this belief by saying that, “Yes, EBP should occur, but, unfortunately, it does not occur on a regular basis” Perhaps, we have not fully understood what it really takes to apply research to practice and a concept or field of study is indeed necessary to deconstruct what it takes. I am, therefore, thrilled that the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is now initiating this dialogue as well. In fact, Special Interest Division 12 could play a leadership role for the larger field of communication disorders.
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