Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention in Neurogenic Disorders With Acquired Dysarthria The following article first appeared in the December 2002 issue (Vol 12, No. 4) of Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, a publication of Division 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders.It is reprinted here with permission. The December issue may be purchased for $8 from ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2003
Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention in Neurogenic Disorders With Acquired Dysarthria
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pamela Mathy
    Arizona State University Tempe, AZ
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / What Have Other Divisions Published about AAC
Article   |   April 01, 2003
Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention in Neurogenic Disorders With Acquired Dysarthria
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2003, Vol. 12, 11-19. doi:10.1044/aac12.2.11
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2003, Vol. 12, 11-19. doi:10.1044/aac12.2.11
The following article first appeared in the December 2002 issue (Vol 12, No. 4) of Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, a publication of Division 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders.It is reprinted here with permission. The December issue may be purchased for $8 from ASHA Product Sales at 1-888-498-6699; ask for item no.0600208.
A diverse group of individuals with acquired neurogenic disorders and severe dysarthria may benefit from augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). These include persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, and those with degenerative neurological diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease (PD), Huntington’s disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS; Doyle, Kennedy, Jausalaitis, & Phillips, 2000; Klasner & Yorkston, 2000; Mathy, Yorkston, & Gutmann, 2000; Yorkston, 1996). The etiology, incidence, and characteristics of these disorders are described elsewhere (e.g., Doyle et al., 2000; Klasner & Yorkston, 2000; Mathy, Yorkston, & Gutmann, 2000; Yorkston, Miller, & Strand, 1995).
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