Reading Development in AAC The application of existing theoretical models of reading development is integral to understanding the role of AAC in literacy. Language plays a central role in all existing models. Therefore, investigating the impact of different AAC systems, strategies, and symbol sets on the development of language is integral to ultimately understanding ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2003
Reading Development in AAC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Erickson
    The Center for Literacy & Disability Studies University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   February 01, 2003
Reading Development in AAC
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, February 2003, Vol. 12, 8-10. doi:10.1044/aac12.1.8
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, February 2003, Vol. 12, 8-10. doi:10.1044/aac12.1.8
The application of existing theoretical models of reading development is integral to understanding the role of AAC in literacy. Language plays a central role in all existing models. Therefore, investigating the impact of different AAC systems, strategies, and symbol sets on the development of language is integral to ultimately understanding the role of AAC in literacy. The consideration of theoretical models will enable us to make sense of existing research, make informed intervention decisions, and systematically address the considerable need for future research regarding AAC in literacy.
Within the field of emergent literacy, extant theories of emergent literacy development have been applied for children without disabilities in both research and practice. William Teale, Elizabeth Sulzby, and others have informed the design of storybook studies (e.g., Koppenhaver et al., 2001; Light, Binger, & Kelford-Smith, 1994), intervention studies (Koppenhaver & Erickson, 2002), the development of intervention materials (King-DeBaun, 1990; Musselwhite, 1993), and attempts to understand the early literacy experiences of children with complex communication needs in their homes (e.g., Coleman, 1991; Light & Kelford-Smith, 1993) and in their schools (e.g., Marvin, 1994). While there is a great deal more to be learned regarding persons using AAC and emergent literacy, the course has been set to base that work on existing theoretical models.
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