AAC Knowledge and Skills ASHA recently published a document detailing the responsibilities, knowledge and skills necessary for speech-language pathologists who provide services in the area of augmentative and alternative communication (ASHA, 2002). This is an official ASHA document. As a member of the Division 12 Steering Committee that authored this publication, and chair of ... Forum
Forum  |   November 01, 2002
AAC Knowledge and Skills
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephen N. Calculator
    University of New Hampshire Durham, NH
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Forum
Forum   |   November 01, 2002
AAC Knowledge and Skills
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, November 2002, Vol. 11, 17-18. doi:10.1044/aac11.3.17
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, November 2002, Vol. 11, 17-18. doi:10.1044/aac11.3.17
ASHA recently published a document detailing the responsibilities, knowledge and skills necessary for speech-language pathologists who provide services in the area of augmentative and alternative communication (ASHA, 2002). This is an official ASHA document. As a member of the Division 12 Steering Committee that authored this publication, and chair of document revisions for that committee, I have been asked to provide an overview of content covered in that document.
First of all, the document acknowledges the multidisciplinary nature of the field in terms of the various professionals whose expertise is required when providing services in AAC. It suggests the typical speech-language pathologist operating alone lacks the skills necessary to provide quality AAC services. However, such services are made possible through collaboration with other professionals, individuals who use AAC, and their families. It is stressed throughout the document that consumers play a critical role in all aspects of AAC service delivery. The model of choice is often the transdisciplinary approach. The knowledge and skills document details discipline specific skills that should be expected of speech-language pathologists who provide AAC services. These are summarized below. When a speech-language pathologist lacks these competencies, he/she should initiate a referral to another professional who is equipped to serve the client effectively.
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