What is an RERC? Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs) exist under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Authority for Rehabilitation Research Engineering Centers is contained in section 204(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 762[b][3]). There are 15 RERCs in the United States. The shared goal of these centers of ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2002
What is an RERC?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael B. Williams
    Augmentative Communication, Inc., Monterey, CA
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2002
What is an RERC?
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, August 2002, Vol. 11, 4-5. doi:10.1044/aac11.2.4
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, August 2002, Vol. 11, 4-5. doi:10.1044/aac11.2.4
Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs) exist under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Authority for Rehabilitation Research Engineering Centers is contained in section 204(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 762[b][3]).
There are 15 RERCs in the United States. The shared goal of these centers of excellence is to research, evaluate, and disseminate innovative methods of applying advanced technology, scientific achievement, and psychological and social knowledge to solve rehabilitation problems and remove environmental barriers. In addition, the RERCs may demonstrate and disseminate innovative delivery models to rural and urban areas, conduct scientific research that assists in meeting employment, and independent living needs of individuals with severe disabilities and provide training opportunities in conjunction with institutions of higher education and nonprofit organizations. RERCs are funded by the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). NIDRR sets the research agenda for each RERC grant by publishing a Request for Proposal (RFP) that describes the priority areas. Each RERC has a different focus. For example, the RERC on Hearing Enhancement promotes technological solutions to problems confronting people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Another example would be the RERC on Information Technology Access, which improves access to a wide range of technologies, including computers and the Web, ATMs, kiosks, hand held electronic personal assistants, point-of-sale devices and smartcards, home and pocket information appliances, Internet technologies, intranets, and 3-D and immersive environments for individuals with all types, degrees, and combinations of disabilities.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.