AAC Intervention for Locked-in Syndrome Using the Safe-Laser Access System This project was supported in part by the Rehabilitation Science and Engineering at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) through Grant R43HD35779. The content and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2002
AAC Intervention for Locked-in Syndrome Using the Safe-Laser Access System
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Fager
    Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering
  • David Beukelman
    Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, University of Nebraska Medical Center
  • Tom Jakobs
    InvoTek Inc.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2002
AAC Intervention for Locked-in Syndrome Using the Safe-Laser Access System
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2002, Vol. 11, 4-7. doi:10.1044/aac11.1.4
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2002, Vol. 11, 4-7. doi:10.1044/aac11.1.4
This project was supported in part by the Rehabilitation Science and Engineering at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) through Grant R43HD35779. The content and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the NICHD, and no official endorsement should be inferred. The authors wish to thank Karen Kenyon, primary speech-language pathologist at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, for her daily support of our efforts. In addition, we wish to thank Merle and his family for their assistance and encouragement.
The authors are currently providing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) services to a man with locked-in syndrome (LIS) following a basilar artery stroke. When he arrived at the Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, his only voluntary movements were eye blinks and vertical eye movement. During the past several months he has made considerable progress establishing multimodality AAC strategies. In this article we (a) provide some background on LIS, (b) summarize the literature about AAC interventions with these individuals, and (c) present a case report of our recent AAC intervention experiences.
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