Categorical AAC Assessment of Persons With Aphasia (PWA) The author wishes to acknowledge that many of the ideas for this paper grew out of discussions with Kathryn Garrett, Pamela Mathy, Lynn Fox, Delva Culp, and David Beukelman at the annual ASHA 2000 Convention in Washington, D.C. With the advent of Medicare funding of AAC devices (as ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2002
Categorical AAC Assessment of Persons With Aphasia (PWA)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne P. Lasker
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2002
Categorical AAC Assessment of Persons With Aphasia (PWA)
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2002, Vol. 11, 14-20. doi:10.1044/aac11.1.14
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2002, Vol. 11, 14-20. doi:10.1044/aac11.1.14
The author wishes to acknowledge that many of the ideas for this paper grew out of discussions with Kathryn Garrett, Pamela Mathy, Lynn Fox, Delva Culp, and David Beukelman at the annual ASHA 2000 Convention in Washington, D.C.
With the advent of Medicare funding of AAC devices (as of January 1, 2001), those of us who work with people who have acquired communication disorders have been offered a unique opportunity to systematize our assessment process. To establish federal funding practices, Medicare has created a set of device groupings based on costs (see Table 1). Researchers and practitioners in AAC may build upon these established device categories to improve the assessment process, especially for people with aphasia (PWA). In this paper, I intend to present information about the nature of the Medicare funding framework, provide a brief description of aphasia, review the theoretical and logistical challenges in applying AAC to people with aphasia, and acquaint the reader with a new categorical assessment protocol that may prove helpful during Medicare evaluations. This paper does not address motor access issues that are frequently dealt with during the AAC assessment process. For more information on this topic, readers are referred to the Beukelman and Mirenda textbook (1998).
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