Supporting AAC Device Users Living in Residential Care Settings Many adults with developmental disabilities and complex communication needs (CCN) use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. Many of these individuals also live in residential care settings, historically referred to as “group homes.” During the day, these individuals may attend some kind of day program, whether educational recreational or ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2004
Supporting AAC Device Users Living in Residential Care Settings
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail M. Van Tatenhove
    Private Practice, Orlando, FL
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Healthcare Settings / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2004
Supporting AAC Device Users Living in Residential Care Settings
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2004, Vol. 13, 8-11. doi:10.1044/aac13.4.8
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2004, Vol. 13, 8-11. doi:10.1044/aac13.4.8
Many adults with developmental disabilities and complex communication needs (CCN) use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. Many of these individuals also live in residential care settings, historically referred to as “group homes.” During the day, these individuals may attend some kind of day program, whether educational recreational or vocational, where they may or may not receive services in support of their AAC system. At their residential setting, these individuals are primarily cared for by direct care staff who have very limited, if any, experience with AAC technology. Their primary role is to provide direct assistance in meeting the person’s daily physical needs and they are typically paid little more than a minimum wage. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the rate of AAC device abandonment occurs at alarming rates for individuals living in residential care settings who do not have ongoing AAC support services (Phillips, 1991; Phillips & Zhao, 1993). Support services within residential care settings are needed to ensure that all individuals using AAC devices can be successful communicators and live as independently as possible. The intent of this article is to provide guidance to speech-language pathologists supporting individuals with CCN living within residential care environments.
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