Early Intervention: Assessment Issues This article is a result of a focus group discussion at the DAAC Leadership Conference in January 2004. Focus group members included Richard Lytton (facilitator, duPont Hospital for Children), Mary Ann Lowe (recorder, Nova Southeastern University), Donna Clegg (Clayton County Schools, Georgia), Katya Hill (Edinboro University), Mary Ann Romski (Georgia ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2004
Early Intervention: Assessment Issues
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard Lytton
    duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2004
Early Intervention: Assessment Issues
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2004, Vol. 13, 22-24. doi:10.1044/aac13.3.21
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2004, Vol. 13, 22-24. doi:10.1044/aac13.3.21
This article is a result of a focus group discussion at the DAAC Leadership Conference in January 2004. Focus group members included Richard Lytton (facilitator, duPont Hospital for Children), Mary Ann Lowe (recorder, Nova Southeastern University), Donna Clegg (Clayton County Schools, Georgia), Katya Hill (Edinboro University), Mary Ann Romski (Georgia State University), and Brian Schulman (Seton Hall University).
AAC may be a critical service for a diverse group of children and families who require Early Intervention (EI) services. This group includes young children who already demonstrate significant impairments and delays in their development of oral speech, expressive language, and/or receptive cognitive/language skills. This population reaches across children who have physical impairments that, at the least, significantly affect oral motor, fine motor, and/or gross motor skills; sensory impairments that significantly effect auditory, visual, and/or tactile-kinesthetic reception and processing; and/or cognitive delays that significantly effect their concept development and symbolic language abilities. The population also includes very young children who are already known to be at risk of developing functional or effective abilities to interact with their environments and the people in it, developing conceptual skills that are the basis of vocabulary and syntax skills, and developing independent pragmatic interaction skills that are the basis for active participation in a communicative world. As with AAC approaches across the life span, there are not specific diagnoses for which AAC may be appropriate. It should be considered for children according to their individualized profiles of developmental strengths and weaknesses, abilities, and disabilities.
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