Beyond Calendar Boxes: The Importance of Systematic Instruction of the van Dijk Approach for Learners Who are Deaf-Blind Systematic instruction in teaching learners who are deaf-blind, including individuals who are severely and multiply disabled, is considered a best practice in the field of severe disabilities (Giangreco, Cloninger, & Iverson, 1993; Snell & Brown, 2000). Systematic instruction incorporates methods of instruction which facilitate learners' responses to their natural ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2000
Beyond Calendar Boxes: The Importance of Systematic Instruction of the van Dijk Approach for Learners Who are Deaf-Blind
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie Z. C. MacFarland
    The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2000
Beyond Calendar Boxes: The Importance of Systematic Instruction of the van Dijk Approach for Learners Who are Deaf-Blind
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2000, Vol. 9, 4-7. doi:10.1044/aac9.4.4
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2000, Vol. 9, 4-7. doi:10.1044/aac9.4.4
Systematic instruction in teaching learners who are deaf-blind, including individuals who are severely and multiply disabled, is considered a best practice in the field of severe disabilities (Giangreco, Cloninger, & Iverson, 1993; Snell & Brown, 2000). Systematic instruction incorporates methods of instruction which facilitate learners' responses to their natural environments given a basis of the following components: functional objectives that contain specified conditions; observable and measurable skills and mastery criteria; a current teacher-based and learner-based schedule; collaborative implementation of instructional strategies within the learner's daily curriculum; and data reflecting the learner's progress. Yet, in the context of implementing AAC systems for learners who are deaf-blind, systematic instruction is often replaced with inconsistent, varying and/or stagnant goals and objectives, strategies, schedules, and evaluation methods. In turn, a learner may not truly have a system at all. Instead, her or she may have a very limited amount of communication forms or a mixture or menu of communication forms that are inconsistently received by the individual.
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