Forum: Family Participation in AAC Several people wrote in the last issue (November, 1998) about the importance of a partnership between the speech language pathologist and the family. Families may not fully support or use AAC strategies or devices because they have been left out of the diagnostic process. Many assessments continue to be ... Forum
Forum  |   February 01, 1999
Forum: Family Participation in AAC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Seton D. Lindsay
    Shriver Center for Mental Retardation Waltham, MA
Article Information
Forum
Forum   |   February 01, 1999
Forum: Family Participation in AAC
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, February 1999, Vol. 8, 19. doi:10.1044/aac8.1.19
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, February 1999, Vol. 8, 19. doi:10.1044/aac8.1.19
Several people wrote in the last issue (November, 1998) about the importance of a partnership between the speech language pathologist and the family. Families may not fully support or use AAC strategies or devices because they have been left out of the diagnostic process. Many assessments continue to be expert-driven (i.e., defined by speech-language pathologist), rather than client/family-driven. If families become an ancillary part of the process, it is not surprising that they often forget or do not find the time to implement recommendations.
As a new member of the field of AAC (currently completing my CFY), I am exploring ways to foster meaningful family involvement, beginning with the diagnostic process. Articles in the November (1998) newsletter suggested the speech-language pathologist's role could shift during the evaluation from expert to consultant. As an expert, the clinician would need to gather data about the client's cognitive, sensory, and motor skills to decide which AAC strategies and devices would be viable options. However, as a consultant, the speech-language pathologist also would ask the client and her or his family about current communication frustrations and goals. The speech-language pathology consultant would identify a range of options to address their concerns and work with the family to develop a communication system.
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