The Reality of Managed Health Care: Implications for AAC Service Delivery In 1990, the state of Oregon, Department of Human Resources, Office of Medical Assistance Programs, developed a progressive set of guidelines for purchasing augmentative communication equipment. These guidelines were written in collaboration with health care professionals from the Oregon's Medical Assistance Program and two speech-language pathologists serving the needs ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1998
The Reality of Managed Health Care: Implications for AAC Service Delivery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jane W. Murphy
    Oregon Health Sciences University Portland
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   May 01, 1998
The Reality of Managed Health Care: Implications for AAC Service Delivery
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, May 1998, Vol. 7, 4-5. doi:10.1044/aac7.2.4
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, May 1998, Vol. 7, 4-5. doi:10.1044/aac7.2.4
In 1990, the state of Oregon, Department of Human Resources, Office of Medical Assistance Programs, developed a progressive set of guidelines for purchasing augmentative communication equipment. These guidelines were written in collaboration with health care professionals from the Oregon's Medical Assistance Program and two speech-language pathologists serving the needs of both children and adults with severe communication disorders. At that time, it was viewed as one of the most innovative and progressive policies in the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Individuals with severe communication disorders who qualified for the Oregon's Medicaid funding were provided voice output communication aids (VOCA) with the following documentation: appropriate assessment of their communication needs, physician's prescription, and medical justification. The spending limit of VOCA's was approximately six thousand dollars. Funding for appropriate training in the use of the VOCA was considered essential in the totality of the dollars allocated. The state hired a certified speech-language pathologist to review and approve all of the AAC funding requests; one of the more unique aspects of this particular policy. With this policy in place, many deserving children and young adults with Medicaid status were recipients of appropriate AAC services and tools.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.