Personal Perspectives on Transition and Assistive Technology I was born with what some may consider to be a severe physical disability that affects my mobility, although it is very rare that I consider myself to have a disability. I also have a speech impairment, the degree of which is often a function of how tired I ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   February 01, 1998
Personal Perspectives on Transition and Assistive Technology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael J. Ward
    National Center on Self Determination and 21st Century Leadership Development, Oregon Institute on Disability and Development, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   February 01, 1998
Personal Perspectives on Transition and Assistive Technology
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, February 1998, Vol. 7, 7-8. doi:10.1044/aac7.1.7
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, February 1998, Vol. 7, 7-8. doi:10.1044/aac7.1.7
I was born with what some may consider to be a severe physical disability that affects my mobility, although it is very rare that I consider myself to have a disability. I also have a speech impairment, the degree of which is often a function of how tired I am and how willing or motivated my audience is to understand me. This speech impairment is perhaps the largest component of my disability since it is a real barrier when communicating to the non-disabled world.
Because this article is about transition and assistive technology, I want to share some personal experiences which convey the importance of assistive technology in my own transition. I consider myself very lucky. My father was a gift to me. He supplied me with all the “low-tech” devices I needed for my early life transitions. He was a machinist and a tool maker, so whether it was a bent spoon, an adapted knob for the steering wheel of my car, or unique kitchen utensils, through trial and error he was able to come up with the right device. I was able to describe exactly what I thought I needed. More important than his mechanical skills was the support he gave me to try different things even when we didn’t know if I would succeed or the kinds of support and devices I would need to be successful.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.