New AAC Access Strategy for Gesture Tracking: A Technical Note This article summarizes the design and evaluation of a new augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) interface strategy for people with complex communication needs and severe physical limitations. This strategy combines typing, gesture recognition, and word prediction to input text into AAC software using touchscreen or head movement tracking access methods. ... Article
Article  |   April 2012
New AAC Access Strategy for Gesture Tracking: A Technical Note
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Fager
    Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, NE
  • Tom Jakobs
    InvoTek, Inc., Alma, AR
  • David Beukelman
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
  • Tricia Ternus
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication
Article   |   April 2012
New AAC Access Strategy for Gesture Tracking: A Technical Note
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2012, Vol. 21, 11-16. doi:10.1044/aac21.1.11
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2012, Vol. 21, 11-16. doi:10.1044/aac21.1.11

This article summarizes the design and evaluation of a new augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) interface strategy for people with complex communication needs and severe physical limitations. This strategy combines typing, gesture recognition, and word prediction to input text into AAC software using touchscreen or head movement tracking access methods. Eight individuals with movement limitations due to spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, polio, and Guillain Barre syndrome participated in the evaluation of the prototype technology using a head-tracking device. Fourteen typical individuals participated in the evaluation of the prototype using a touchscreen.

Acknowledgements
The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Communication Enhancement (AAC-RERC) is funded under grant #H133E080011 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) in the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS). The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development funded the software development under grant 1R43HD058388-01.The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
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